Our Delicate Pale Blue Dot: Earth

Pale blue dot

 

The Pale Blue Dot is a photograph of planet Earth taken in 1990 by the Voyager 1 spacecraft, which was about 6 billion kilometres (3.7 billion miles) from Earth. Voyager 1 had completed its primary mission and was leaving the Solar System. At the request of Carl Sagan, NASA turned its camera around and took a photograph of Earth, a tiny dot in the in the vastness of space 




Carl’s wonderfully eloquent description: “everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was has lived on this pale blue dot;  every saint and sinner in the history of our species has lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.”


“Earth is the only world known so far to harbour life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.”

NASA also has a more recent picture from the Cassini probe

The full piece can be heard on this YouTube video

WEEE (e-Scrap)  is one of the fastest growing and most toxic of the wastes we produce on our planet. It is also totally recyclable but needs special treatment. Consider our beautiful, irreplaceable “Pale Blue Dot” the next time you need to dispose of your no longer useful electronic devices.

Give Electronic Recycling a call, we can help 

 

President Trump, Brexit and the Environment


Environment

 

Hopefully the latest shift of power in the USA, combined with the recent Brexit vote to leave the EU, who define most of our environmental policies, will not reverse the drive towards a permanently sustainable environment for all.



What’s the point of a successful economy if the environment we have to live in is a sewer?


 

Ireland has been making some progress but the latest report from the EPA shows that there is much still to do  



The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive of 2005 (re-cast in 2012) is an example of how environmental legislation can drive the management of waste in a more sustainable direction.


Even with the WEEE Directive in full force, we still only manage to collect and treat about 35% of the 10 million Tonnes of waste electronics generated in the EU every year.


The Paris COP21 signed by 197 countries this year (so far ratified by 103 countries) is an example of environmental policies that can only be agreed if the global community are on board, especially the larger and more affluent countries. The COP21 is the first such agreement that the USA has ever signed up to.


Electronic Recycling are actively involved in collecting and managing WEEE in Ireland, committed to being part of the solution of the EU target to collect and treat 65% of all electronic equipment placed on the market.