GDPR Protection of Personal Data from 25th May 2018

General Data Protection Regulations, GDPR
GDPR


On May 25th the EU General Data Protection Regulation, GDPR will come directly into force across the EU. This is a “Regulation” so therefore it does not need individual Member State transposition into national laws, it applies automatically and immediately.



The aim if the regulation
It allows European Union (EU) citizens to better control their personal data. It also modernises and unifies rules allowing businesses to reduce red tape and to benefit from greater consumer trust.

The general data protection regulation (GDPR) is part of the EU data protection reform package, along with the data protection directive for police and criminal justice authorities.

Key Points

Citizens’ rights
The GDPR strengthens existing rights, provides for new rights and gives citizens more control over their personal data. These include:

Easier access to their data
including providing more information on how that data is processed and ensuring that that information is available in a clear and understandable way;

A new right to data portability
making it easier to transmit personal data between service providers;

A clearer right to erasure (‘right to be forgotten’)
when an individual no longer wants their data processed and there is no legitimate reason to keep it, the data will be deleted;

Right to know when their personal data has been hacked
Companies and organisations will have to inform individuals promptly of serious data breaches. They will also have to notify the relevant data protection supervisory authority.

Rules for businesses

The GDPR is designed to create business opportunities and stimulate innovation through a number of steps including:

A single set of EU-wide rules
a single EU-wide law for data protection is estimated to make savings of €2.3 billion per year;

A data protection officer
responsible for data protection, will be designated by public authorities and by businesses which process data on a large scale;

One-stop-shop
businesses only have to deal with one single supervisory authority (in the EU country in which they are mainly based);

EU rules for non-EU companies;
companies based outside the EU must apply the same rules when offering services or goods, or monitoring behaviour of individuals within the EU;

Innovation-friendly rules
a guarantee that data protection safeguards are built into products and services from the earliest stage of development (data protection by design and by default);

Privacy-friendly techniques
such as pseudonymising (when identifying fields within a data record are replaced by one or more artificial identifiers) and encryption (when data is coded in such a way that only authorised parties can read it);

Removal of notifications
The new data protection rules will scrap most notification obligations and the costs associated with these. One of the aims of the data protection regulation is to remove obstacles to free flow of personal data within the EU. This will make it easier for businesses to expand;

Impact assessments
Businesses will have to carry out impact assessments when data processing may result in a high risk for the rights and freedoms of individuals;

Record-keeping
SMEs are not required to keep records of processing activities, unless the processing is regular or likely to result in a risk to the rights and freedoms of the person whose data is being processed.


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Data Security and the regulation covering the GDPR does not end when you are no longer using the storage media that contains the data. It is important to make certain that your GDPR implementation strategy includes a process for dealing with end of life data storage media.

This is where Electronic Recycling can help. We have been managing secure data destruction since 2009 check out our Data Destruction page.

If you have responsibility for the GDPR implementation, give us a shout, we take that responsibility seriously.

Reference: EUR-Lex, Access to European Law 

Posted in: Business, Data Security, GDPR

MEPs vote to boost recycling, cut landfill targets and curb food waste.

EU Landfill TargetsOn March 14th 2017, MEPs at the European Parliament approved the Simona Bonafè MEP led EU Environment Committee report.

In a clear signal to both the Commission and the Council, the European Parliament has confirmed the increased ambition of the Environment Committee on four legislative proposals on waste, deciding to restore the ambitious recycling and landfill targets in line with what the Commission had originally proposed in 2014 and confirming their proposals from January this year

The share of waste to be recycled should be raised to 70% by 2030, from 44% today, while landfill targets, which have a big environmental impact, should be limited to 5%, said Environment Committee MEPs on Tuesday, as they amended the draft EU “waste package” legislation. They also advocate a 50% reduction in food waste by 2030.

Statistics from 2014 suggest that 44% of all municipal waste in the EU is recycled or composted. This compares to just 31% in 2004, and by 2020 EU member states should be recycling or composting over 50% of waste.

Commenting Simona Bonafè MEP said,  “The ENVI committee has showed that it believes in the transition towards a circular economy. “There will no longer be the possibility for Member States with the lowest recycling rates to have a ‘blanket’ derogation. They will be able to request a derogation, but it will be subject to specific conditions”

Waste and packaging waste By 2030, at least 70% by weight of so-called municipal waste (from households and businesses) should be recycled or prepared for re-use, (i.e. checked, cleaned or repaired), say MEPs. The European Commission proposed 65%.

For packaging materials, such as paper and cardboard, plastics, glass, metal and wood, MEPs propose an 80% target for 2030, with interim 2025 targets for each material.

Landfill Targets The draft law limits the share of municipal waste to be landfilled to 10% by 2030. MEPs propose tightening this to 5%, albeit with a possible five-year extension, under certain conditions, for member states which landfilled more than 65% of their municipal waste in 2013. EU countries such as Cyprus, Croatia, Greece, Latvia, Malta and Romania still landfill more than three quarters of their municipal waste.

Food waste Food waste in the EU is estimated at some 89 million tonnes, or 180 kg per capita per year. MEPs advocate an EU food waste reduction target of 30% by 2025 and 50% by 2030, compared to 2014. They also propose a similar target for marine litter.

Some background numbers In 2014, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden sent virtually no municipal waste to landfill, whereas Cyprus, Croatia, Greece, Latvia and Malta still landfill more than three quarters of their municipal waste.

Although waste management in the EU has improved considerably in recent decades, almost a third of municipal waste is still landfilled and less than half is recycled or composted, with wide variations between member states.

Improving waste management could deliver benefits for the environment, climate, human health and the economy. As part of a shift in EU policy towards a circular economy, the European Commission made four legislative proposals introducing new waste-management targets regarding reuse, recycling and landfilling.

The proposals also strengthen EU provisions on waste prevention and extended producer responsibility, and streamline definitions, reporting obligations and calculation methods for targets.

Source: European Parliament News

Posted in: Environment, News